Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
into syria to secure these chemical weapons sites, but as of just today there have been no signs that any of those forces have been put on alert or there was any detail planning to do this. so there was some question here of whether assad may be calling t president's bluff. >> rose: and what exactly do you think they would be prepared to do and what would trigger that? clearly the movement of them. but it is more or less than that? >> well, u.s. intelligence officials were watching very closely the movement of syrian forces and in also trying to divine the intentions of president assad. clearly the rebels in syria have had a very good few -- past few weeks and making advances on the capital of damascus and president assad really feels like his back may be up against the wall. but is he desperate enough now to play this card which would almost certainly draw some kind of western response. >> rose: one more time, the red line is simply moving the chemical weapons? >> well, this is interesting, charlie, because the president said either moving them or using them. today secretary of state cli
in syria at trends to escalate. the military alliance has brought missiles. grave concern that president assad may consider chemical weapons. >> the gunfire has shown why they're asking for no. this time it was some of the wounded who crossed into turkey but artillery and mortar rounds have landed here, killing civilians. this is what nato hopes will deter an increasingly desperate regime. patriot missiles with sophisticated radar that can shoot down any incoming missiles and planes, locking onto a target in seconds with a range of more than 60 miles. nato foreign ministers approved sending the missiles to turkey with the u.s., the netherlands, and germany providing the weapons but the alliance stressed the move was defensive. >> the deployment of patriot missiles will serve as an effective deterrent and that way, diaz with the situation along the syrian-turkish border. >> russia is the one fly in the right man. the foreign minister said he would not block the move. a sign an old ally may be losing patience with president assaad. they hope deploying missiles will help stabilize tensions
and saying no to bad things, but we need to do more than that gwen: abroad, tensions in syria on the rise. can the u.s. intervene? should we? covering the week -- jackie calmes of "new york times," eamon javers of cnbc, amy walter of abc news, and james kitfield of "national journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nations capitol, this is washington week with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- ♪ >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to charlotte a greater path, in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by prudential additional funding is also provided by the annenberg financial. foundation, the corpo
weekend in egypt and there was news from syria. the pentagon announced that it will send patriot air defense missiles and 400 troops to turkey as part of a nato force. the aim is to protect turkish territory from potential missile attacks from syria. this comes as russia is backtracking on yesterday's statement that the opposition might actually win there. >> syrian forces bombing rebel positions on the turkish border earlier this year. the wounded brought across to the turkish side. syrian shells have landed on turkish territory itself also causing casualties. it could be vulnerable to serbian missile fire, turkey asked to protect against any such threat, we are deploying two patriot battalions here to turkey, along with the troops that are necessary to man those batteries. so that we can help turkey had a missile defense that they may very well need in dealing with threats that come out of syria. >> the american defense secretary announcing that the u.s. was joining germany and benevolence in providing patriot missiles. does this risk raising the stakes? >> i see these as predomina
are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: we turn now to the conflict in syria. the country's neighbor, turkey, received long-sought-after defense help from nato today. the military coalition also expressed growing concerns about the assad regime's chemical weapons supply. in an all too familiar scenes of civil war, rockets blasted and fires flared overseer i can't today. far from the fighting in brussels, nato members approved turkey's request for patriot antimissile systems. they will defend against syrian shelling and rocket fire that land on the turkish side. the issue has taken on greater urgency. amid u.s. warnings that syria could be preparing to use chemical weapons against the rebels. >> the syrian stock piles of chemical weapons are a matter of great concerns. we know that syria possesses... we know they have the chemical weapons. it is a matter of urgency to ensure effective defense and protection of our ally turkey. >> woodruff: nato chief also warned of even stronger action if the syrian government crosses the chemical line. echoing monday's stateme
engel, has escaped from kidnappers in northern syria. he and his crew said they were dragged from their car on thursday by gunman supporting the assad regime. they escaped last night when their captors became engaged in a firefight with rebel forces. engel spoke in turkey today, flanked by two of his crew. we're very happy to be out. we're very happy to be back in turkey. we love being here. we love this country. we appreciate all the help. the last five days are days that we would rather forget. if you can understand, we just came out now. we haven't even left yet. we're very tired. >> holman: engel said he and his colleagues were kept bound and blindfolded, and subjected to mock executions. it was unclear whether all of the crew members escaped. five people working with a u.n. polio vaccination campaign in pakistan were shot to death today, possibly as part of a taliban campaign. a sixth worker was killed a day earlier. we have a report narrated by lindsey hilsum of independent television news. >> reporter: they were trying to prevent pakistani children from being crippled by po
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)